Plenary Speakers

Simon Singh

Author

Simon Singh is an author, journalist and television producer, specialising in science and mathematics. He grew up in Somerset and studied physics at Imperial College, London, studying as a postgraduate at Cambridge University and at CERN in Geneva. He joined the BBC's Science Department in 1990, working as a producer and director. He directed the BAFTA award-winning documentary 'Fermat's Last Theorem' in 1996, exploring one of the most challenging problems in mathematics. His own book, also called Fermat's Last Theorem, was published in 1997.

His second book, The Code Book (1999), explores the history of codes, codebreaking and cryptography. He presented 'The Science of Secrecy', a five-part series for Channel 4 television in 2001, and published a book of the same name (an adaptation of The Code Book), to accompany the series.

Simon Singh

He has also recently presented theatrical science lectures in London and Edinburgh as part of 'Theatre of Science' with Richard Wiseman. Simon Singh's latest book, written with Edzard Ernst, is Trick or Treatment?: Aternative Medicine on Trial (2008).

Prof. Paolo Bonato

Director, Motion Analysis Laboratory,
Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School

Prof. Paolo Bonato received the M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy (1989), and the Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering from Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma, Italy (1995). From 1996 to 2002 he was Research Assistant Professor at the NeuroMuscular Research Center of Boston University, Boston, MA. He currently serves as Director of the Motion Analysis Laboratory at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA, he is Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, and he is member of the Affiliated Faculty of the Harvard‐MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.

Prof. Paolo Bonato

Dr. Bonato is Senior Member of the IEEE, IEEE EMBS AdCom member, and and VP of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology. He is Founder and Editor‐in‐Chief of Journal on NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation and Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering and IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine.

His research work includes wearable technology and its applications in physical medicine and rehabilitation, electromyography, and biomechanics of movement. He has developed intelligent signal processing tools for investigating problems in neurophysiology and artificial intelligence systems for the analysis of data recorded using wearable sensors.

Blaise Aguera y Arcas

Architect of MSN
Microsoft Live Labs

Blaise has a broad background in computer science and applied math, and has been writing software for more than 20 years, with special empasis on graphics, machine learning and data analysis. He graduated from Princeton University with a BA in Physics in 1998, and attended the PhD program there in Applied Math. His experience includes extensive independent research, consulting and freelance software design in a variety of areas, including computational neuroscience, graphics, computational drug design, data compression and others. In 2001 he received worldwide press coverage for his discovery, using computational methods, of the printing technology used by Johann Gutenberg, considered the inventor of printing from movable type in the West. This technology differs markedly from later printing technologies, suggesting a reassessment of Gutenberg's traditional historical role. Blaise's work on early printing was the subject of a BBC Open University documentary, entitled What Did Gutenberg Invent? He has published essays and research papers in theoretical biology, neuroscience and history in The EMBO Journal, Neural Computation and Nature.

Blaise Aguera y Arcas

In 2004 he founded Seadragon, Inc., to develop ideas in scalable architectures and user interfaces for interacting with large volumes of visual information, potentially over a narrow-bandwidth connection. Microsoft bought Seadragon at the beginning of 2006. The Seadragon team’s most visible project to date is Photosynth (labs.live.com/photosynth), a collaboration with researchers at Microsoft Research and the University of Washington.